1. The HBO series “Game of Thrones” transports audiences to a fantasy world in which the politics and violence are as brutally real as our own. The Dothraki are a nomadic warrior tribe that figure heavily in the series. When the show’s creators were looking for someone to invent a language for the Dothraki people, they needed something that sounded as believable as the bloody battles looked.
The Berkeley-trained linguist and Language Creation Society member David Peterson got the job when he submitted a 300-page book of Dothraki vocabulary and grammar. More.
(Photo: Jason Momoa as Khal Drogo in the HBO series “Game of Thrones” / CC Dothraki language)

    The HBO series “Game of Thrones” transports audiences to a fantasy world in which the politics and violence are as brutally real as our own. The Dothraki are a nomadic warrior tribe that figure heavily in the series. When the show’s creators were looking for someone to invent a language for the Dothraki people, they needed something that sounded as believable as the bloody battles looked.

    The Berkeley-trained linguist and Language Creation Society member David Peterson got the job when he submitted a 300-page book of Dothraki vocabulary and grammar. More.

    (Photo: Jason Momoa as Khal Drogo in the HBO series “Game of Thrones” / CC Dothraki language)

  2. Goodbye Andy.
(Photo: Actor Andy Griffith, circa 1955. From The U.S. Steel Hour/Wikipedia.)

    Goodbye Andy.

    (Photo: Actor Andy Griffith, circa 1955. From The U.S. Steel Hour/Wikipedia.)

  3. That icon of American TV, “Dallas” is getting a second life as a new show on TNT. Why was the show such a huge prime-time phenomenon in the 1980s? What did it do for America’s image overseas, where it was syndicated in over 90 countries? Studio 360 explores.

    That icon of American TV, “Dallas” is getting a second life as a new show on TNT. Why was the show such a huge prime-time phenomenon in the 1980s? What did it do for America’s image overseas, where it was syndicated in over 90 countries? Studio 360 explores.

  4. Hand it to AMC’s “Mad Men":on its own, it has reshaped the way we think about the 1960s. Much of that is the work of costume designer Janie Bryant, whose outfits and shifts in style signal the tensions of 1960s America. (Photo: Christina Hendricks as Joan Harris and Jon Hamm as Don Draper in a scene from “Mad Men.” Jordin Althaus/AMC) 
Writer Tom Fitzgerald deconstructs the characters’ clothes in obsessive detail each week for tomandlorenzo.com and “Slate”. He says Bryant dressed the characters as if they were still living in the 1950s to reflect how unprepared they were for their current decade. “That’s why Betty worked a very Grace Kelly look and Joan used to work a very Marilyn Monroe look, because these were iconic 1950s women,” Fitzgerald explains. More.

    Hand it to AMC’s “Mad Men":on its own, it has reshaped the way we think about the 1960s. Much of that is the work of costume designer Janie Bryant, whose outfits and shifts in style signal the tensions of 1960s America. (Photo: Christina Hendricks as Joan Harris and Jon Hamm as Don Draper in a scene from “Mad Men.” Jordin Althaus/AMC)

    Writer Tom Fitzgerald deconstructs the characters’ clothes in obsessive detail each week for tomandlorenzo.com and “Slate”. He says Bryant dressed the characters as if they were still living in the 1950s to reflect how unprepared they were for their current decade. “That’s why Betty worked a very Grace Kelly look and Joan used to work a very Marilyn Monroe look, because these were iconic 1950s women,” Fitzgerald explains. More.

  5. For your Friday viewing pleasure: Rob Ross feeds a squirrel.

  6. braiker:

    Dick Clark, dipping his diphthong on the original Batman. You will see no better Dick Clark clip than this.

  7. We caught “Harper Lee: Hey, Boo" on American Masers this weekend on PBS — fantastic documentary about the author and her book!
Last week marked the 50th anniversary of the film adaptation of “To Kill a Mockingbird.”

    We caught “Harper Lee: Hey, Boo" on American Masers this weekend on PBS — fantastic documentary about the author and her book!

    Last week marked the 50th anniversary of the film adaptation of “To Kill a Mockingbird.”

  8. (Photo: Kerry Washington in “Scandal,” courtesy of ABC, via Studio 360) 
Over the last decade, Kerry Washington has became well-known for terrific performances in movies like"The Last King of Scotland"and "Ray.” She’s now the star of her own new network series, which even today is a rare feat for an African-American actress. 

In “Scandal,” Washington plays Olivia Pope, a DC lawyer-fixer who disappears the problems of her VIP clients. The character is based on Judy Smith, who served in the first Bush White House and whose private clients included Monica Lewinsky, Michael Vick, and Idaho Senator Larry Craig.
"Seldom in life is the good guy all good and the bad guy all bad," Kerry says of her character. "And I think one of the things that Olivia is committed to is that everyone deserves a shot." More.

    (Photo: Kerry Washington in “Scandal,” courtesy of ABC, via Studio 360)

    Over the last decade, Kerry Washington has became well-known for terrific performances in movies like"The Last King of Scotland"and "Ray.” She’s now the star of her own new network series, which even today is a rare feat for an African-American actress.

    In “Scandal,” Washington plays Olivia Pope, a DC lawyer-fixer who disappears the problems of her VIP clients. The character is based on Judy Smith, who served in the first Bush White House and whose private clients included Monica Lewinsky, Michael Vick, and Idaho Senator Larry Craig.

    "Seldom in life is the good guy all good and the bad guy all bad," Kerry says of her character. "And I think one of the things that Olivia is committed to is that everyone deserves a shot." More.

  9. Album Art

    Attorney, businessman, technology expert and 2006 winner of “Survivor,” Yul Kwon talks about hosting the new four-part PBS series, “America Revealed.”

    The series looks at every day items — a stop light, a slice of pizza, or the hot air coming out of your hair dryer — and delves into the “what” and “who” behind them. The show doesn’t just unveil the secrets of how stuff is made; it also tells a story of America’s history and people.

    Employing maps, data visualizations and a number of other tools, the show uses groundbreaking imagery to tell the stories.

    "What we’re trying to do is give the viewers a sense of the big picture," Yul says. "I don’t think a show like this would have been possible, even just a few years ago, because a lot of the technology didn’t exist for us to visualize a lot of this data."

    More.

About me

The PRI Arts Tumblr is a collection of beguiling items created by our producers or found by our curators. PRI produces and distributes news, current events, arts and music content for radio, web and on-demand.

Likes