1. thirteenny:

    A very interesting representation of space, the full installation can be found at the Bridge Gallery. 

    industrialist:

    FreelandBuck’s Slipstream installation at the Bridge Gallery in New York - a physical structure that confronts that leap directly, translating a 2-dimensional digital line drawing into 3-dimensional space.

  2. Artist Leonor Caraballo and her husband, Abou Farmanhas, have come up with a new approach to representing breast cancer: they make bronze models of real tumors, created from MRI scans, that can be worn or displayed.
"For me it’s a reminder that I’m here and this thing is out of my body," said Caraballo, who is a cancer survivor. "And I feel more powerful than it." More.
(Photo: A sculpture of a tumor made by caraballo-farman for Object Breast Cancer. Courtesy of caraballo-farman.)

    Artist Leonor Caraballo and her husband, Abou Farmanhas, have come up with a new approach to representing breast cancer: they make bronze models of real tumors, created from MRI scans, that can be worn or displayed.

    "For me it’s a reminder that I’m here and this thing is out of my body," said Caraballo, who is a cancer survivor. "And I feel more powerful than it." More.

    (Photo: A sculpture of a tumor made by caraballo-farman for Object Breast Cancer. Courtesy of caraballo-farman.)

  3. Drink local. That’s the message of artist Colin Hart, whose public art piece lets the bravest New Yorkers sample water from the Hudson River. (Don’t worry, the murky brown liquid has been filtered to be crystal clear and safe to drink.) Hart’s piece is part of an exhibit called Surface Tension that focuses on water: its movement, its growing scarcity, its contaminants, and its power to heal. More.
(Photo: “Urban Water Needs” by Hal Watts and Matthew Laws: water makes the sponges in this world map grow in proportion to the country’s water use. Courtesy of Science Gallery, Trinity College Dublin)

    Drink local. That’s the message of artist Colin Hart, whose public art piece lets the bravest New Yorkers sample water from the Hudson River. (Don’t worry, the murky brown liquid has been filtered to be crystal clear and safe to drink.) Hart’s piece is part of an exhibit called Surface Tension that focuses on water: its movement, its growing scarcity, its contaminants, and its power to heal. More.

    (Photo: “Urban Water Needs” by Hal Watts and Matthew Laws: water makes the sponges in this world map grow in proportion to the country’s water use. Courtesy of Science Gallery, Trinity College Dublin)

  4. An installation housed in a former funeral home in Paris is an undulating landscape made of 65,000 discarded CDs. Architect Clémence Eliard and artist Elise Morin are the creators of the installation. (Photo from dezeen.com)

    An installation housed in a former funeral home in Paris is an undulating landscape made of 65,000 discarded CDs. Architect Clémence Eliard and artist Elise Morin are the creators of the installation. (Photo from dezeen.com)

  5. bookspaperscissors:

    Book sculptures by Daniel Lai

  6. kpseesee:

    Korean sculptor Seung Mo Park creates giant ephemeral portraits by cutting layer after layer of wire mesh. Each work begins with a photograph which is superimposed over layers of wire with a projector, then Park slowly snips away areas of mesh.

  7. archiemcphee:

    Behold The Great Monkey Project by cardboard sculptor and woodcutter James Grashow! James recently made headlines for an impressive sculptural installation called Corrugated Fountain. Back in 2008, he created 100 awesome life-size monkeys out of cardboard and then hung them in the San Jose Museum of Art’s lobby. As he says, “The more monkeys you have, the more the space between them starts to jump. The ceiling becomes an abstract painting.”

    We love it! Less talk, more awesome cardboard monkeys!

    [via My Modern Metropolis]

  8. The Physical Impossibility of Death in the Mind of Someone Living by Damien Hirst (1991). (Photo: Wikipedia)
British artist Damien Hirst opens his first major retrospective in London this week.
The Tate Modern gallery will showcase the work of the enfant terrible-turned-multi-millionaire featuring 70 works including classics like the above piece featuring a shark suspended in formaldehyde. Hirst is a constant target of fierce critics who question whether what he does is art, yet his pieces bring in millions from collectors. More.

    The Physical Impossibility of Death in the Mind of Someone Living by Damien Hirst (1991). (Photo: Wikipedia)

    British artist Damien Hirst opens his first major retrospective in London this week.

    The Tate Modern gallery will showcase the work of the enfant terrible-turned-multi-millionaire featuring 70 works including classics like the above piece featuring a shark suspended in formaldehyde. Hirst is a constant target of fierce critics who question whether what he does is art, yet his pieces bring in millions from collectors. More.

  9. Dirty art: Every piece in “Swept Away”, an exhibition at New York’s Museum of Arts and Design, is made up made of dirt, dust, trash, or pollution. (Photo: Detail of “Flora,” Phoebe Cummings, 2010. From Museum of Art and Design / Sylvain Deleu) 
There is quilt made of lint, a dust-covered cleaning cloth molded into the shape of a skull, and sculptures of crows burned to charcoal and smeared all over the place. There’s also a “dirt map” — an 8x10-foot plastic tray filled with 15 years of soil samples. More.

    Dirty art: Every piece in “Swept Away”, an exhibition at New York’s Museum of Arts and Design, is made up made of dirt, dust, trash, or pollution. (Photo: Detail of “Flora,” Phoebe Cummings, 2010. From Museum of Art and Design / Sylvain Deleu)

    There is quilt made of lint, a dust-covered cleaning cloth molded into the shape of a skull, and sculptures of crows burned to charcoal and smeared all over the place. There’s also a “dirt map” — an 8x10-foot plastic tray filled with 15 years of soil samples. More.

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The PRI Arts Tumblr is a collection of beguiling items created by our producers or found by our curators. PRI produces and distributes news, current events, arts and music content for radio, web and on-demand.

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