1. theparisreview:

A Partial Inventory of Gustave Flaubert’s Personal Effects
As Catalogued by M. Lemoel on May 20, 1880, Twelve Days after the Writer’s Death.
In the bedroom on the first floor:
panama hattop hatred silk cravat5 pairs of gloves19 shirts2 dressing gowns5 waistcoasts7 walking stickstobacco jartwo pairs of boots

    theparisreview:

    A Partial Inventory of Gustave Flaubert’s Personal Effects

    As Catalogued by M. Lemoel on May 20, 1880, Twelve Days after the Writer’s Death.

    In the bedroom on the first floor:

    panama hat
    top hat
    red silk cravat
    5 pairs of gloves
    19 shirts
    2 dressing gowns
    5 waistcoasts
    7 walking sticks
    tobacco jar
    two pairs of boots

  2. It’s the ultimate summer reading list. The Library of Congress has announced its list of the 88 ‘Books That Shaped America.’ From Benjamin Franklin’s “Experiments and Observations on Electricity” to the late Ray Bradbury’s “Fahrenheit 451” and from the “Scarlet Letter” to “The Cat in the Hat,” the chronological list is diverse.The Library of Congress claims that the list isn’t intended to be a “best of”. Instead, it’s an eclectic mix of books that have contributed to the American conversation over the years. The exhibition of the 88 titles opens today. More.

    It’s the ultimate summer reading list. The Library of Congress has announced its list of the 88 ‘Books That Shaped America.’ From Benjamin Franklin’s “Experiments and Observations on Electricity” to the late Ray Bradbury’s “Fahrenheit 451” and from the “Scarlet Letter” to “The Cat in the Hat,” the chronological list is diverse.

    The Library of Congress claims that the list isn’t intended to be a “best of”. Instead, it’s an eclectic mix of books that have contributed to the American conversation over the years. The exhibition of the 88 titles opens today. More.

  3. Album Art

    Winner of a 2012 National Edward R. Murrow Award: Studio 360’s “Secrets of a Blonde Bombshell,” about Ina Ray Hutton, who in the 1930s conducted, tapped, and sang as the “blonde bombshell bandleader,” strutting her stuff in front of her all–female swing band, the Melodears.

    Ina led bands through the 1950s — in clubs, in movies, on TV, on the USO circuit — and was the first female bandleader to be recorded and filmed. She wasn’t a legend or an innovator, but a hard–working musician who played a role in jazz history.

    Years later, a news reporter discovers Ina had a big secret: she was black and had been passing for white. More.

    (Photo: Ina Ray Hutton in her teens. Courtesy of Susan Stordahl Porter)

  4. Album Art

    Attorney, businessman, technology expert and 2006 winner of “Survivor,” Yul Kwon talks about hosting the new four-part PBS series, “America Revealed.”

    The series looks at every day items — a stop light, a slice of pizza, or the hot air coming out of your hair dryer — and delves into the “what” and “who” behind them. The show doesn’t just unveil the secrets of how stuff is made; it also tells a story of America’s history and people.

    Employing maps, data visualizations and a number of other tools, the show uses groundbreaking imagery to tell the stories.

    "What we’re trying to do is give the viewers a sense of the big picture," Yul says. "I don’t think a show like this would have been possible, even just a few years ago, because a lot of the technology didn’t exist for us to visualize a lot of this data."

    More.

  5. pbsthisdayinhistory:

MARCH 6, 1986: GEORGIA O’KEEFFE DIES
On this day in 1986, at the age of 98, painter Georgia O’Keeffe passed away.
Among the great American artists of the 20th-century, Georgia O’Keeffe stands as one of the most compelling.
In 1929 O’Keeffe took a vacation with her friend Beck Strand to Taos, New Mexico. The trip would forever alter the course of her life.
Read her full biography on the American Masters website.

    pbsthisdayinhistory:

    MARCH 6, 1986: GEORGIA O’KEEFFE DIES

    On this day in 1986, at the age of 98, painter Georgia O’Keeffe passed away.

    Among the great American artists of the 20th-century, Georgia O’Keeffe stands as one of the most compelling.

    In 1929 O’Keeffe took a vacation with her friend Beck Strand to Taos, New Mexico. The trip would forever alter the course of her life.


    Read her full biography on the American Masters website.

  6. "Shimomura Crossing the Delaware," 2011. The painting is part of artist Roger Shimomura’s series American Knockoffs. (Image courtesy of the artist.)
Shimomura’s paintings are featured as part of the Smithsonian’s National Portrait Gallery exhibition Portraiture Now: Asian American Portraits of Encounter (in Washington DC through October 14).  Roger Shimomura: An American Knockoff, a solo show, is on view online via Kansas City’s Byron Cohen Gallery through the end of this month.
For decades, in his prints, paintings, and performances, Shimomura has explored Asian-American stereotypes and issues of ethnic identity with pop culture in the mix.
Shimomura’s grandparents were from Japan, but he was born in Seattle,  Wash. When he was a toddler, he and his family were sent to Camp Minidoka,  an internment camp in Idaho. It was one of ten camps where Japanese  Americans were relocated during World War II. ”It was 1998, I think,  when my New York dealer asked everyone in her gallery to try to recall  their first 10 memories of life,” says Shimomura. “And mine were all in  the camp.”
More.

    "Shimomura Crossing the Delaware," 2011. The painting is part of artist Roger Shimomura’s series American Knockoffs. (Image courtesy of the artist.)

    Shimomura’s paintings are featured as part of the Smithsonian’s National Portrait Gallery exhibition Portraiture Now: Asian American Portraits of Encounter (in Washington DC through October 14).  Roger Shimomura: An American Knockoff, a solo show, is on view online via Kansas City’s Byron Cohen Gallery through the end of this month.

    For decades, in his prints, paintings, and performances, Shimomura has explored Asian-American stereotypes and issues of ethnic identity with pop culture in the mix.

    Shimomura’s grandparents were from Japan, but he was born in Seattle, Wash. When he was a toddler, he and his family were sent to Camp Minidoka, an internment camp in Idaho. It was one of ten camps where Japanese Americans were relocated during World War II. ”It was 1998, I think, when my New York dealer asked everyone in her gallery to try to recall their first 10 memories of life,” says Shimomura. “And mine were all in the camp.”

    More.

  7. Album Art

    In the 1930s, Ina Ray Hutton conducted, tapped, and sang as the “blonde bombshell bandleader,” strutting her stuff in front of her all–female swing band, the Melodears. She led bands through the 1950s — in clubs, in movies, on TV, on the USO circuit — and was the first female bandleader to be recorded and filmed. She wasn’t a legend or an innovator, but a hard–working musician who played a role in jazz history.

    Decades later, a news reporter from KUOW in Seattle looked at one of her albums and felt something was odd: the blonde bombshell, she thought, might have been black. Phyllis Fletcher discovered that Ina Ray Hutton had been passing as white — hiding in the spotlight. 

    Note: This story from Studio 360 received a Gracie Award for Outstanding Portrait/Biography.

    (Image: Ina Ray Hutton in her teens (Courtesy of Susan Stordahl Porter))

  8. Today is the 110th birthday of Harlem Renaissance author and social activist Langston Hughes.
Tonight, WQXR in New York will air “I, Too, Sing America: Music in the Life of Langston Hughes,” which tells the story of Hughes’ life in music, including the dramatic tale of his collaboration with William Grant Still:

For 15 years, against the backdrop of pre-Civil Rights racism, the two fought to see their opera become a reality. Their historic success came in 1949, when ‘Troubled Island’ – which told the story of Haitian revolution leader Jean-Jacques Dessalines– was staged by the New York City Opera, becoming the first opera by African Americans to ever be staged by a major company.
The documentary will include recordings of select pieces of Hughes’ musical works, some of which were never performed again in their entirety after their original production. It will also feature archival interview tape of William Grant Still discussing ‘Troubled Island.’

    Today is the 110th birthday of Harlem Renaissance author and social activist Langston Hughes.

    Tonight, WQXR in New York will air “I, Too, Sing America: Music in the Life of Langston Hughes,” which tells the story of Hughes’ life in music, including the dramatic tale of his collaboration with William Grant Still:

    For 15 years, against the backdrop of pre-Civil Rights racism, the two fought to see their opera become a reality. Their historic success came in 1949, when ‘Troubled Island’which told the story of Haitian revolution leader Jean-Jacques Dessalines– was staged by the New York City Opera, becoming the first opera by African Americans to ever be staged by a major company.

    The documentary will include recordings of select pieces of Hughes’ musical works, some of which were never performed again in their entirety after their original production. It will also feature archival interview tape of William Grant Still discussing ‘Troubled Island.’

  9. Mysterious cave art thought to be done by children 13,000 years ago

    "The cave’s been known for a really long time, and these lines and drawings were just kind of mysterious figures," Jessica Cooney explains. Some 10 years ago, however, researchers were "able to get thousands of children and adults today to recreate finger flutings in clay and plaster of Paris."

    They used that information and compared it to the cave drawings. “By measuring the width of your three middle fingers, you can actually get a very individualized number,” Cooney says. “People who had a measurement of 34 mm or less are actually children who are 7 years old or younger,” and some of those people contributed to the cave drawings.

    Read more at pri.org

  10. The wedding of Gen. & Mrs. Tom Thumb.
Part of P.T. Barnum’s circus, they were the most photographed couple of their time—huge celebrities. President Abraham Lincoln even hosted their wedding reception at the White House. The Thumbs were less than 3 feet tall.
Learn more about the missus (née Lavinia Warren) at pri.org

    The wedding of Gen. & Mrs. Tom Thumb.

    Part of P.T. Barnum’s circus, they were the most photographed couple of their time—huge celebrities. President Abraham Lincoln even hosted their wedding reception at the White House. The Thumbs were less than 3 feet tall.

    Learn more about the missus (née Lavinia Warren) at pri.org

About me

The PRI Arts Tumblr is a collection of beguiling items created by our producers or found by our curators. PRI produces and distributes news, current events, arts and music content for radio, web and on-demand.

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