1. Pop music getting sadder. Why?
A study just published in the Journal of Psychology of Aesthetics, Creativity, and the Arts tracked the mood of pop songs over five decades of Billboard charts, and it confirms that pop has changed in substantial ways. Far more of today’s hits are now in minor keys (which most of us hear as sadder or more complex) — more than half, as compared to just 15% in the 1960s.
View chart.

    Pop music getting sadder. Why?

    A study just published in the Journal of Psychology of Aesthetics, Creativity, and the Arts tracked the mood of pop songs over five decades of Billboard charts, and it confirms that pop has changed in substantial ways. Far more of today’s hits are now in minor keys (which most of us hear as sadder or more complex) — more than half, as compared to just 15% in the 1960s.

    View chart.

  2. "Chicken with Plums," currently in theaters, is based on a graphic novel by Marjane Satrapi, the creator of "Persepolis."The movie is visually stunning, with its intricately detailed set and costume design — and absolutely no CGI. “I come from illustration and I love to do things with the hand,” Satrapi says, “When I make a movie, every detail, from the color of the brick to the skirt of a woman, the laces of the shoes, everything is of a major importance to me.” Satrapi combined live action, animation, and even puppets to construct a magic-realist 1950s Iran in “Chicken with Plums,” which tells the story of a virtuoso violinist living in Tehran. More.
(Photo: Still from “Chicken with Plums.” ©Patricia Khan, courtesy of Sony Pictures Classics.)

    "Chicken with Plums," currently in theaters, is based on a graphic novel by Marjane Satrapi, the creator of "Persepolis."

    The movie is visually stunning, with its intricately detailed set and costume design — and absolutely no CGI. “I come from illustration and I love to do things with the hand,” Satrapi says, “When I make a movie, every detail, from the color of the brick to the skirt of a woman, the laces of the shoes, everything is of a major importance to me.”

    Satrapi combined live action, animation, and even puppets to construct a magic-realist 1950s Iran in “Chicken with Plums,” which tells the story of a virtuoso violinist living in Tehran. More.

    (Photo: Still from “Chicken with Plums.” ©Patricia Khan, courtesy of Sony Pictures Classics.)

  3. Movie wars: “Avengers” director Joss Whedon explains why he has a problem with Ira Glass’ new movie, “Sleepwalk with Me.” Hilarious.

    More about Ira’s movie here.

  4. The HBO series “Game of Thrones” transports audiences to a fantasy world in which the politics and violence are as brutally real as our own. The Dothraki are a nomadic warrior tribe that figure heavily in the series. When the show’s creators were looking for someone to invent a language for the Dothraki people, they needed something that sounded as believable as the bloody battles looked.
The Berkeley-trained linguist and Language Creation Society member David Peterson got the job when he submitted a 300-page book of Dothraki vocabulary and grammar. More.
(Photo: Jason Momoa as Khal Drogo in the HBO series “Game of Thrones” / CC Dothraki language)

    The HBO series “Game of Thrones” transports audiences to a fantasy world in which the politics and violence are as brutally real as our own. The Dothraki are a nomadic warrior tribe that figure heavily in the series. When the show’s creators were looking for someone to invent a language for the Dothraki people, they needed something that sounded as believable as the bloody battles looked.

    The Berkeley-trained linguist and Language Creation Society member David Peterson got the job when he submitted a 300-page book of Dothraki vocabulary and grammar. More.

    (Photo: Jason Momoa as Khal Drogo in the HBO series “Game of Thrones” / CC Dothraki language)

  5. Goodbye Andy.
(Photo: Actor Andy Griffith, circa 1955. From The U.S. Steel Hour/Wikipedia.)

    Goodbye Andy.

    (Photo: Actor Andy Griffith, circa 1955. From The U.S. Steel Hour/Wikipedia.)

  6. Actor Benjamin Walker and director Timur Bekmambetov on the set of “Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter.”  (Photo by Steven Vaughan) 
"Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter" re-imagines the American Civil War with blood-sucking undead lurking around every corner. Vampires insinuate themselves into the slave-holding Confederacy, but buy slaves for food, not forced labor. 
Director Timur Bekmambetov (“Night Watch,” “Wanted”) says he decided to take the story seriously. “It’s not trivializing anything,” Bekmambetov said. “We created a myth, emotionally explaining what happened in the 19th century.” More.

    Actor Benjamin Walker and director Timur Bekmambetov on the set of “Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter.” (Photo by Steven Vaughan)

    "Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter" re-imagines the American Civil War with blood-sucking undead lurking around every corner. Vampires insinuate themselves into the slave-holding Confederacy, but buy slaves for food, not forced labor.

    Director Timur Bekmambetov (“Night Watch,” “Wanted”) says he decided to take the story seriously. “It’s not trivializing anything,” Bekmambetov said. “We created a myth, emotionally explaining what happened in the 19th century.” More.

  7. That icon of American TV, “Dallas” is getting a second life as a new show on TNT. Why was the show such a huge prime-time phenomenon in the 1980s? What did it do for America’s image overseas, where it was syndicated in over 90 countries? Studio 360 explores.

    That icon of American TV, “Dallas” is getting a second life as a new show on TNT. Why was the show such a huge prime-time phenomenon in the 1980s? What did it do for America’s image overseas, where it was syndicated in over 90 countries? Studio 360 explores.

  8. Hand it to AMC’s “Mad Men":on its own, it has reshaped the way we think about the 1960s. Much of that is the work of costume designer Janie Bryant, whose outfits and shifts in style signal the tensions of 1960s America. (Photo: Christina Hendricks as Joan Harris and Jon Hamm as Don Draper in a scene from “Mad Men.” Jordin Althaus/AMC) 
Writer Tom Fitzgerald deconstructs the characters’ clothes in obsessive detail each week for tomandlorenzo.com and “Slate”. He says Bryant dressed the characters as if they were still living in the 1950s to reflect how unprepared they were for their current decade. “That’s why Betty worked a very Grace Kelly look and Joan used to work a very Marilyn Monroe look, because these were iconic 1950s women,” Fitzgerald explains. More.

    Hand it to AMC’s “Mad Men":on its own, it has reshaped the way we think about the 1960s. Much of that is the work of costume designer Janie Bryant, whose outfits and shifts in style signal the tensions of 1960s America. (Photo: Christina Hendricks as Joan Harris and Jon Hamm as Don Draper in a scene from “Mad Men.” Jordin Althaus/AMC)

    Writer Tom Fitzgerald deconstructs the characters’ clothes in obsessive detail each week for tomandlorenzo.com and “Slate”. He says Bryant dressed the characters as if they were still living in the 1950s to reflect how unprepared they were for their current decade. “That’s why Betty worked a very Grace Kelly look and Joan used to work a very Marilyn Monroe look, because these were iconic 1950s women,” Fitzgerald explains. More.

  9. reuters:

Tom and Ray Magliozzi, hosts of National Public Radio’s popular “Car Talk” program, will retire in September after decades of dispensing automotive repair and driving advice laced with a side of wicked humor.
The pair, in their guise as the self-deprecating Click and Clack, the Tappett Brothers, have been taping the weekly show for WBUR, Boston’s public radio affiliate, for 35 years, but say it is time to “stop and smell the cappuccino.”
Elder statesman Tom Magliozzi turns 75 this year.
“My brother has always been ‘work-averse,’” Ray Magliozzi, 63, said in a statement. “Now, apparently, even the one hour a week is killing him.”
NPR will continue to broadcast the show with material curated from the best of the more than 1,200 episodes recorded by the Magliozzis over the years, with occasional updates from the brothers.
READ MORE: “Car Talk” brothers announce retirement

    reuters:

    Tom and Ray Magliozzi, hosts of National Public Radio’s popular “Car Talk” program, will retire in September after decades of dispensing automotive repair and driving advice laced with a side of wicked humor.

    The pair, in their guise as the self-deprecating Click and Clack, the Tappett Brothers, have been taping the weekly show for WBUR, Boston’s public radio affiliate, for 35 years, but say it is time to “stop and smell the cappuccino.”

    Elder statesman Tom Magliozzi turns 75 this year.

    “My brother has always been ‘work-averse,’” Ray Magliozzi, 63, said in a statement. “Now, apparently, even the one hour a week is killing him.”

    NPR will continue to broadcast the show with material curated from the best of the more than 1,200 episodes recorded by the Magliozzis over the years, with occasional updates from the brothers.

    READ MORE: “Car Talk” brothers announce retirement

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The PRI Arts Tumblr is a collection of beguiling items created by our producers or found by our curators. PRI produces and distributes news, current events, arts and music content for radio, web and on-demand.

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