1. laphamsquarterly:

Teenage Emily Dickinson, meet adult Emily Dickinson….maybe.
A new photograph has surfaced in Amherst that reportedly shows Emily Dickinson in her mid-twenties. Her dress is apparently out of fashion for the time,1859, but that’s in keeping with her personality: “I’m so old fashioned, Darling, that all your friends would stare.”
“Emily Dickinson gets a new look in recovered photograph” [The Guardian]

    laphamsquarterly:

    Teenage Emily Dickinson, meet adult Emily Dickinson….maybe.

    A new photograph has surfaced in Amherst that reportedly shows Emily Dickinson in her mid-twenties. Her dress is apparently out of fashion for the time,1859, but that’s in keeping with her personality: “I’m so old fashioned, Darling, that all your friends would stare.”

    “Emily Dickinson gets a new look in recovered photograph” [The Guardian]

  2. vintageanchor:

Margaret Atwood’s 10 Rules for Writing Fiction
1 Take a pencil to write with on aeroplanes. Pens leak. But if the pencil breaks, you can’t sharpen it on the plane, because you can’t take knives with you. Therefore: take two pencils.2 If both pencils break, you can do a rough sharpening job with a nail file of the metal or glass type.3 Take something to write on. Paper is good. In a pinch, pieces of wood or your arm will do.4 If you’re using a computer, always safeguard new text with a memory stick.5 Do back exercises. Pain is distracting.6 Hold the reader’s attention. (This is likely to work better if you can hold your own.) But you don’t know who the reader is, so it’s like shooting fish with a slingshot in the dark. What fascinates A will bore the pants off B.7 You most likely need a thesaurus, a rudimentary grammar book, and a grip on reality. This latter means: there’s no free lunch. Writing is work. It’s also gambling. You don’t get a pension plan. Other people can help you a bit, but ¬essentially you’re on your own. Nobody is making you do this: you chose it, so don’t whine.8 You can never read your own book with the innocent anticipation that comes with that first delicious page of a new book, because you wrote the thing. You’ve been backstage. You’ve seen how the rabbits were smuggled into the hat. Therefore ask a reading friend or two to look at it before you give it to anyone in the publishing business. This friend should not be someone with whom you have a romantic relationship, unless you want to break up.9 Don’t sit down in the middle of the woods. If you’re lost in the plot or blocked, retrace your steps to where you went wrong. Then take the other road. And/or change the person. Change the tense. Change the opening page.10 Prayer might work. Or reading something else. Or a constant visualization of the holy grail that is the finished, published version of your resplendent book.

    vintageanchor:

    Margaret Atwood’s 10 Rules for Writing Fiction

    1 Take a pencil to write with on aeroplanes. Pens leak. But if the pencil breaks, you can’t sharpen it on the plane, because you can’t take knives with you. Therefore: take two pencils.
    2 If both pencils break, you can do a rough sharpening job with a nail file of the metal or glass type.
    3 Take something to write on. Paper is good. In a pinch, pieces of wood or your arm will do.
    4 If you’re using a computer, always safeguard new text with a memory stick.
    5 Do back exercises. Pain is distracting.
    6 Hold the reader’s attention. (This is likely to work better if you can hold your own.) But you don’t know who the reader is, so it’s like shooting fish with a slingshot in the dark. What fascinates A will bore the pants off B.
    7 You most likely need a thesaurus, a rudimentary grammar book, and a grip on reality. This latter means: there’s no free lunch. Writing is work. It’s also gambling. You don’t get a pension plan. Other people can help you a bit, but ¬essentially you’re on your own. Nobody is making you do this: you chose it, so don’t whine.
    8 You can never read your own book with the innocent anticipation that comes with that first delicious page of a new book, because you wrote the thing. You’ve been backstage. You’ve seen how the rabbits were smuggled into the hat. Therefore ask a reading friend or two to look at it before you give it to anyone in the publishing business. This friend should not be someone with whom you have a romantic relationship, unless you want to break up.
    9 Don’t sit down in the middle of the woods. If you’re lost in the plot or blocked, retrace your steps to where you went wrong. Then take the other road. And/or change the person. Change the tense. Change the opening page.
    10 Prayer might work. Or reading something else. Or a constant visualization of the holy grail that is the finished, published version of your resplendent book.

  3. theparisreview:

A Partial Inventory of Gustave Flaubert’s Personal Effects
As Catalogued by M. Lemoel on May 20, 1880, Twelve Days after the Writer’s Death.
In the bedroom on the first floor:
panama hattop hatred silk cravat5 pairs of gloves19 shirts2 dressing gowns5 waistcoasts7 walking stickstobacco jartwo pairs of boots

    theparisreview:

    A Partial Inventory of Gustave Flaubert’s Personal Effects

    As Catalogued by M. Lemoel on May 20, 1880, Twelve Days after the Writer’s Death.

    In the bedroom on the first floor:

    panama hat
    top hat
    red silk cravat
    5 pairs of gloves
    19 shirts
    2 dressing gowns
    5 waistcoasts
    7 walking sticks
    tobacco jar
    two pairs of boots

  4. penamerican:

From Crown Publishing’s Facebook page: Anyone need inspiration for a bibliophile’s birthday party?

SRZ

Too pretty, and literary, to eat!

    penamerican:

    From Crown Publishing’s Facebook page: Anyone need inspiration for a bibliophile’s birthday party?


    SRZ

    Too pretty, and literary, to eat!

  5. wnyc:

“I can talk for an hour without notes, but for 15 minutes, I have to read it. I shall look up occasionally to give an air of spontaneity.” Thus, Gore Vidal begins one of his customarily suave and witty speeches, this one delivered at a Books and Authors Luncheon held on November 30, 1964.
Visit the WNYC Archives to hear a clip from the speech.
photo by Carl Van Vechten (1880–1964)

    wnyc:

    “I can talk for an hour without notes, but for 15 minutes, I have to read it. I shall look up occasionally to give an air of spontaneity.” Thus, Gore Vidal begins one of his customarily suave and witty speeches, this one delivered at a Books and Authors Luncheon held on November 30, 1964.

    Visit the WNYC Archives to hear a clip from the speech.

    photo by Carl Van Vechten (1880–1964)

  6. “Mike Stilkey’s Wonderfully Whimsical Book Paintings”

    see more book paintings

    Very cool.

  7. "This is among the things that start happening to you when you get older, when you’re supposed to be in what people are always telling you is your prime and the best years of your life, but the truth is that your life is kind of slowly slipping away."

    Nora Ephron on The Takeaway in November 2010, talking about her collection of essays called “I Remember Nothing.”

    Nora Ephron

  8. It’s the ultimate summer reading list. The Library of Congress has announced its list of the 88 ‘Books That Shaped America.’ From Benjamin Franklin’s “Experiments and Observations on Electricity” to the late Ray Bradbury’s “Fahrenheit 451” and from the “Scarlet Letter” to “The Cat in the Hat,” the chronological list is diverse.The Library of Congress claims that the list isn’t intended to be a “best of”. Instead, it’s an eclectic mix of books that have contributed to the American conversation over the years. The exhibition of the 88 titles opens today. More.

    It’s the ultimate summer reading list. The Library of Congress has announced its list of the 88 ‘Books That Shaped America.’ From Benjamin Franklin’s “Experiments and Observations on Electricity” to the late Ray Bradbury’s “Fahrenheit 451” and from the “Scarlet Letter” to “The Cat in the Hat,” the chronological list is diverse.

    The Library of Congress claims that the list isn’t intended to be a “best of”. Instead, it’s an eclectic mix of books that have contributed to the American conversation over the years. The exhibition of the 88 titles opens today. More.

  9. Author Ray Bradbury has died at the age of 91. (Photo: Ray Bradbury in 1975. Alan Light/Wikipedia) In this archival interview from Studio 360, Bradbury describes how, as a young writer in the early 1950s, he was tapped by John Huston to write the screenplay for “Moby Dick” (at 36:50). The film’s key scene where Captain Ahab comes into contact with the white whale — which was not in Melville’s book — was Bradbury’s own contribution to the story.

    Author Ray Bradbury has died at the age of 91. (Photo: Ray Bradbury in 1975. Alan Light/Wikipedia)

    In this archival interview from Studio 360, Bradbury describes how, as a young writer in the early 1950s, he was tapped by John Huston to write the screenplay for “Moby Dick” (at 36:50).

    The film’s key scene where Captain Ahab comes into contact with the white whale — which was not in Melville’s book — was Bradbury’s own contribution to the story.

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The PRI Arts Tumblr is a collection of beguiling items created by our producers or found by our curators. PRI produces and distributes news, current events, arts and music content for radio, web and on-demand.

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