1. A wall devoted to paintings of rabbits at Hunt Slonem’s studio. (Photo: Josh Rogosin)Manhattan’s West Side has plenty of artist studios, but none quite like Hunt Slonem’s. Housed on the third floor of a football field-sized warehouse, it’s stuffed with plaster busts, chandeliers, neo-gothic furniture, Persian rugs, porcelain tchotchkes, and a greenhouse worth of lush foliage.Then there are the birds — lots of them, inside cages and out. Slonem’s birds are an endless source of inspiration for the artist who spent part of his childhood in Hawaii and later lived in Nicaragua. When he’s not painting tropical birds or butterflies Slonem turns to another favorite subject — rabbits.“I discovered one night, late in a Chinese restaurant, that I’m the sign of a rabbit — and I sort of start the day doing these little pieces,” he says. Set in Victorian-era frames salvaged from a local flea market, the rabbit paintings cover an entire studio wall. “I hate leaving a wall bare,” says Slonem. “It makes me nervous.” More.
    A wall devoted to paintings of rabbits at Hunt Slonem’s studio. (Photo: Josh Rogosin)

    Manhattan’s West Side has plenty of artist studios, but none quite like Hunt Slonem’s. Housed on the third floor of a football field-sized warehouse, it’s stuffed with plaster busts, chandeliers, neo-gothic furniture, Persian rugs, porcelain tchotchkes, and a greenhouse worth of lush foliage.

    Then there are the birds — lots of them, inside cages and out. Slonem’s birds are an endless source of inspiration for the artist who spent part of his childhood in Hawaii and later lived in Nicaragua. When he’s not painting tropical birds or butterflies Slonem turns to another favorite subject — rabbits.

    “I discovered one night, late in a Chinese restaurant, that I’m the sign of a rabbit — and I sort of start the day doing these little pieces,” he says. Set in Victorian-era frames salvaged from a local flea market, the rabbit paintings cover an entire studio wall. “I hate leaving a wall bare,” says Slonem. “It makes me nervous.” More.
  2. pbsthisdayinhistory:

MARCH 6, 1986: GEORGIA O’KEEFFE DIES
On this day in 1986, at the age of 98, painter Georgia O’Keeffe passed away.
Among the great American artists of the 20th-century, Georgia O’Keeffe stands as one of the most compelling.
In 1929 O’Keeffe took a vacation with her friend Beck Strand to Taos, New Mexico. The trip would forever alter the course of her life.
Read her full biography on the American Masters website.

    pbsthisdayinhistory:

    MARCH 6, 1986: GEORGIA O’KEEFFE DIES

    On this day in 1986, at the age of 98, painter Georgia O’Keeffe passed away.

    Among the great American artists of the 20th-century, Georgia O’Keeffe stands as one of the most compelling.

    In 1929 O’Keeffe took a vacation with her friend Beck Strand to Taos, New Mexico. The trip would forever alter the course of her life.


    Read her full biography on the American Masters website.

  3. "Shimomura Crossing the Delaware," 2011. The painting is part of artist Roger Shimomura’s series American Knockoffs. (Image courtesy of the artist.)
Shimomura’s paintings are featured as part of the Smithsonian’s National Portrait Gallery exhibition Portraiture Now: Asian American Portraits of Encounter (in Washington DC through October 14).  Roger Shimomura: An American Knockoff, a solo show, is on view online via Kansas City’s Byron Cohen Gallery through the end of this month.
For decades, in his prints, paintings, and performances, Shimomura has explored Asian-American stereotypes and issues of ethnic identity with pop culture in the mix.
Shimomura’s grandparents were from Japan, but he was born in Seattle,  Wash. When he was a toddler, he and his family were sent to Camp Minidoka,  an internment camp in Idaho. It was one of ten camps where Japanese  Americans were relocated during World War II. ”It was 1998, I think,  when my New York dealer asked everyone in her gallery to try to recall  their first 10 memories of life,” says Shimomura. “And mine were all in  the camp.”
More.

    "Shimomura Crossing the Delaware," 2011. The painting is part of artist Roger Shimomura’s series American Knockoffs. (Image courtesy of the artist.)

    Shimomura’s paintings are featured as part of the Smithsonian’s National Portrait Gallery exhibition Portraiture Now: Asian American Portraits of Encounter (in Washington DC through October 14).  Roger Shimomura: An American Knockoff, a solo show, is on view online via Kansas City’s Byron Cohen Gallery through the end of this month.

    For decades, in his prints, paintings, and performances, Shimomura has explored Asian-American stereotypes and issues of ethnic identity with pop culture in the mix.

    Shimomura’s grandparents were from Japan, but he was born in Seattle, Wash. When he was a toddler, he and his family were sent to Camp Minidoka, an internment camp in Idaho. It was one of ten camps where Japanese Americans were relocated during World War II. ”It was 1998, I think, when my New York dealer asked everyone in her gallery to try to recall their first 10 memories of life,” says Shimomura. “And mine were all in the camp.”

    More.

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