1. "Chicken with Plums," currently in theaters, is based on a graphic novel by Marjane Satrapi, the creator of "Persepolis."The movie is visually stunning, with its intricately detailed set and costume design — and absolutely no CGI. “I come from illustration and I love to do things with the hand,” Satrapi says, “When I make a movie, every detail, from the color of the brick to the skirt of a woman, the laces of the shoes, everything is of a major importance to me.” Satrapi combined live action, animation, and even puppets to construct a magic-realist 1950s Iran in “Chicken with Plums,” which tells the story of a virtuoso violinist living in Tehran. More.
(Photo: Still from “Chicken with Plums.” ©Patricia Khan, courtesy of Sony Pictures Classics.)

    "Chicken with Plums," currently in theaters, is based on a graphic novel by Marjane Satrapi, the creator of "Persepolis."

    The movie is visually stunning, with its intricately detailed set and costume design — and absolutely no CGI. “I come from illustration and I love to do things with the hand,” Satrapi says, “When I make a movie, every detail, from the color of the brick to the skirt of a woman, the laces of the shoes, everything is of a major importance to me.”

    Satrapi combined live action, animation, and even puppets to construct a magic-realist 1950s Iran in “Chicken with Plums,” which tells the story of a virtuoso violinist living in Tehran. More.

    (Photo: Still from “Chicken with Plums.” ©Patricia Khan, courtesy of Sony Pictures Classics.)

  2. The Rivera Court at the Detroit Institute of Arts. (Courtesy of the Detroit Institute of Arts) 
Residents of Macomb, Oakland, and Wayne counties in Michigan voted to raise their own property taxes a fraction of a percent to help fund the Detroit Institute of Arts. The 127-year-old museum, which is home to work by Vincent Van Gogh and Diego Rivera, has struggled for years to sustain itself with diminishing government funding. More.

    The Rivera Court at the Detroit Institute of Arts. (Courtesy of the Detroit Institute of Arts)


    Residents of Macomb, Oakland, and Wayne counties in Michigan voted to raise their own property taxes a fraction of a percent to help fund the Detroit Institute of Arts. The 127-year-old museum, which is home to work by Vincent Van Gogh and Diego Rivera, has struggled for years to sustain itself with diminishing government funding. More.

  3. Julius Popp’s “BIT.FALL” offers up a waterfall of words. (Photo courtesy of the Science Gallery, Trinity College Dublin.)
How BIT.FALL works: A machine creates words composed of tiny water droplets that fall like rain from the ceiling. The words may seem random, but they’re actually quite timely. A computer trawls news websites and uses a statistical algorithm to select the words.
The installation is part of an exhibit called “Surface Tension” that focuses on water: its movement, its growing scarcity, its contaminants, and its power to heal. More.

    Julius Popp’s “BIT.FALL” offers up a waterfall of words. (Photo courtesy of the Science Gallery, Trinity College Dublin.)

    How BIT.FALL works: A machine creates words composed of tiny water droplets that fall like rain from the ceiling. The words may seem random, but they’re actually quite timely. A computer trawls news websites and uses a statistical algorithm to select the words.

    The installation is part of an exhibit called “Surface Tension” that focuses on water: its movement, its growing scarcity, its contaminants, and its power to heal. More.

  4. Album Art

    Winner of a 2012 National Edward R. Murrow Award: Studio 360’s “Secrets of a Blonde Bombshell,” about Ina Ray Hutton, who in the 1930s conducted, tapped, and sang as the “blonde bombshell bandleader,” strutting her stuff in front of her all–female swing band, the Melodears.

    Ina led bands through the 1950s — in clubs, in movies, on TV, on the USO circuit — and was the first female bandleader to be recorded and filmed. She wasn’t a legend or an innovator, but a hard–working musician who played a role in jazz history.

    Years later, a news reporter discovers Ina had a big secret: she was black and had been passing for white. More.

    (Photo: Ina Ray Hutton in her teens. Courtesy of Susan Stordahl Porter)

  5. Author Ray Bradbury has died at the age of 91. (Photo: Ray Bradbury in 1975. Alan Light/Wikipedia) In this archival interview from Studio 360, Bradbury describes how, as a young writer in the early 1950s, he was tapped by John Huston to write the screenplay for “Moby Dick” (at 36:50). The film’s key scene where Captain Ahab comes into contact with the white whale — which was not in Melville’s book — was Bradbury’s own contribution to the story.

    Author Ray Bradbury has died at the age of 91. (Photo: Ray Bradbury in 1975. Alan Light/Wikipedia)

    In this archival interview from Studio 360, Bradbury describes how, as a young writer in the early 1950s, he was tapped by John Huston to write the screenplay for “Moby Dick” (at 36:50).

    The film’s key scene where Captain Ahab comes into contact with the white whale — which was not in Melville’s book — was Bradbury’s own contribution to the story.

  6. "Men in Black III" director Barry Sonnenfeld with one of the cool props from the movie. (Photo by Wilson Webb) 
Sonnenfeld says the third installment of the MIB franchise, in part, an attempt to redeem the sins of “Men in Black II,” which was trying too hard to be funny. 
"We just had too much of Frank the Pug singing ‘I Will Survive,’" Sonnenfeld admits. “You don’t want anyone to know they’re working on a comedy when they’re doing a comedy," he says. "You don’t want the cinematographer to know because he’ll make it too bright. You don’t want the composer to know because he’ll make the music too happy. And you definitely don’t want the actors to know because they’ll make it — quote — ‘funny.’"
More.

    "Men in Black III" director Barry Sonnenfeld with one of the cool props from the movie. (Photo by Wilson Webb)

    Sonnenfeld says the third installment of the MIB franchise, in part, an attempt to redeem the sins of “Men in Black II,” which was trying too hard to be funny.

    "We just had too much of Frank the Pug singing ‘I Will Survive,’" Sonnenfeld admits. “You don’t want anyone to know they’re working on a comedy when they’re doing a comedy," he says. "You don’t want the cinematographer to know because he’ll make it too bright. You don’t want the composer to know because he’ll make the music too happy. And you definitely don’t want the actors to know because they’ll make it — quote — ‘funny.’"

    More.

  7. China’s Guangzhou opera house perches on a patch of grass like a spaceship that’s just touched down. (Photo from “Site and Sound: The Architecture and Acoustics of New Opera Houses and Concert Halls” by Victoria Newhouse)
In the last decade, concert hall construction has been booming. And according to architectural historian Victoria Newhouse, these buildings are changing our experience of live music in unexpected ways. She singles out two that reflect the extremes of the concert hall boom: the nearly billion-dollar opera house in Oslo, Norway (where visitors can walk on a slanted roof that leads to water) and the brand new opera house in Guangzhou, China, designed by Zaha Hadid. More.

    China’s Guangzhou opera house perches on a patch of grass like a spaceship that’s just touched down. (Photo from “Site and Sound: The Architecture and Acoustics of New Opera Houses and Concert Halls” by Victoria Newhouse)

    In the last decade, concert hall construction has been booming. And according to architectural historian Victoria Newhouse, these buildings are changing our experience of live music in unexpected ways. She singles out two that reflect the extremes of the concert hall boom: the nearly billion-dollar opera house in Oslo, Norway (where visitors can walk on a slanted roof that leads to water) and the brand new opera house in Guangzhou, China, designed by Zaha Hadid. More.

  8. Taryn Simon. Chapter XVII from A Living Man Declared Dead and Other Chapters I–XVIII (detail). 2011. Pigmented inkjet prints, 84 x 241 7/8” (213.4 x 614.4 cm). Courtesy the artist. © Taryn Simon
Taryn Simon’s photographs are crisp to the point of being stark, stripped of all but the most essential elements.Her latest work focuses on families — “bloodlines” — and tries to trace how time, events, and choices shape their fates. Nine bloodlines are on view at New York’s Museum of Modern Art in the exhibition Taryn Simon: A Living Man Declared Dead and Other Chapters. More.

    Taryn Simon. Chapter XVII from A Living Man Declared Dead and Other Chapters I–XVIII (detail). 2011. Pigmented inkjet prints, 84 x 241 7/8” (213.4 x 614.4 cm). Courtesy the artist. © Taryn Simon

    Taryn Simon’s photographs are crisp to the point of being stark, stripped of all but the most essential elements.

    Her latest work focuses on families — “bloodlines” — and tries to trace how time, events, and choices shape their fates. Nine bloodlines are on view at New York’s Museum of Modern Art in the exhibition Taryn Simon: A Living Man Declared Dead and Other Chapters. More.

  9. Ode to a Teen Idol Poetry Contest — Is there a rock god or some other star you idolize? Studio 360 wants your poem about the star who captured your imagination — as a teenager or now.
Your submission could get read on the air! Get details here and/or read current submissions, like this one by JMD from Philadelphia:

Diamond Dave
The broken ankle on the backOf the album coverAn epic leapAn epic fallA vaudeville clownish professional wrestlerDropping hints as subtle as aGlass of milk spilled on the floorBut oh the grinBut oh the sinIt may not be good, but goddamnIt’s right
Tell me to Jump, Diamond DaveAnd I won’t ask how high
I’ll just do it.May as well.

    Ode to a Teen Idol Poetry Contest — Is there a rock god or some other star you idolize? Studio 360 wants your poem about the star who captured your imagination — as a teenager or now.

    Your submission could get read on the air! Get details here and/or read current submissions, like this one by JMD from Philadelphia:

    Diamond Dave

    The broken ankle on the back
    Of the album cover
    An epic leap
    An epic fall
    A vaudeville clownish professional wrestler
    Dropping hints as subtle as a
    Glass of milk spilled on the floor
    But oh the grin
    But oh the sin
    It may not be good, but goddamn
    It’s right

    Tell me to Jump, Diamond Dave
    And I won’t ask how high

    I’ll just do it.
    May as well.

About me

The PRI Arts Tumblr is a collection of beguiling items created by our producers or found by our curators. PRI produces and distributes news, current events, arts and music content for radio, web and on-demand.

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