1. Artist Leonor Caraballo and her husband, Abou Farmanhas, have come up with a new approach to representing breast cancer: they make bronze models of real tumors, created from MRI scans, that can be worn or displayed.
"For me it’s a reminder that I’m here and this thing is out of my body," said Caraballo, who is a cancer survivor. "And I feel more powerful than it." More.
(Photo: A sculpture of a tumor made by caraballo-farman for Object Breast Cancer. Courtesy of caraballo-farman.)

    Artist Leonor Caraballo and her husband, Abou Farmanhas, have come up with a new approach to representing breast cancer: they make bronze models of real tumors, created from MRI scans, that can be worn or displayed.

    "For me it’s a reminder that I’m here and this thing is out of my body," said Caraballo, who is a cancer survivor. "And I feel more powerful than it." More.

    (Photo: A sculpture of a tumor made by caraballo-farman for Object Breast Cancer. Courtesy of caraballo-farman.)

  2. wnyc:

“I can talk for an hour without notes, but for 15 minutes, I have to read it. I shall look up occasionally to give an air of spontaneity.” Thus, Gore Vidal begins one of his customarily suave and witty speeches, this one delivered at a Books and Authors Luncheon held on November 30, 1964.
Visit the WNYC Archives to hear a clip from the speech.
photo by Carl Van Vechten (1880–1964)

    wnyc:

    “I can talk for an hour without notes, but for 15 minutes, I have to read it. I shall look up occasionally to give an air of spontaneity.” Thus, Gore Vidal begins one of his customarily suave and witty speeches, this one delivered at a Books and Authors Luncheon held on November 30, 1964.

    Visit the WNYC Archives to hear a clip from the speech.

    photo by Carl Van Vechten (1880–1964)

  3. John James Audubon’s life-sized paintings of American birds have had a profound effect on the study of natural history. In the 1800s, the collection of Audubon’s large portraits were made into a book called “Audubon’s Birds of America.” One of the complete original sets is housed at Amherst College in Massachusetts. More.
(Image: Plate from “Birds of America” by John James Audubon, featuring the Ivory-billed Woodpecker. From Wikipedia.)

    John James Audubon’s life-sized paintings of American birds have had a profound effect on the study of natural history. In the 1800s, the collection of Audubon’s large portraits were made into a book called “Audubon’s Birds of America.” One of the complete original sets is housed at Amherst College in Massachusetts. More.

    (Image: Plate from “Birds of America” by John James Audubon, featuring the Ivory-billed Woodpecker. From Wikipedia.)

  4. Julius Popp’s “BIT.FALL” offers up a waterfall of words. (Photo courtesy of the Science Gallery, Trinity College Dublin.)
How BIT.FALL works: A machine creates words composed of tiny water droplets that fall like rain from the ceiling. The words may seem random, but they’re actually quite timely. A computer trawls news websites and uses a statistical algorithm to select the words.
The installation is part of an exhibit called “Surface Tension” that focuses on water: its movement, its growing scarcity, its contaminants, and its power to heal. More.

    Julius Popp’s “BIT.FALL” offers up a waterfall of words. (Photo courtesy of the Science Gallery, Trinity College Dublin.)

    How BIT.FALL works: A machine creates words composed of tiny water droplets that fall like rain from the ceiling. The words may seem random, but they’re actually quite timely. A computer trawls news websites and uses a statistical algorithm to select the words.

    The installation is part of an exhibit called “Surface Tension” that focuses on water: its movement, its growing scarcity, its contaminants, and its power to heal. More.

  5. archiemcphee:

    thaeger posted a fantastic collection of photos of awesome works of art created using dirty car windows. These are a few of our favourites. Be sure to check out the rest.

    Dogs Playing Poker for the win!

    What?! Wow!

  6. “Mike Stilkey’s Wonderfully Whimsical Book Paintings”

    see more book paintings

    Very cool.

  7. Drink local. That’s the message of artist Colin Hart, whose public art piece lets the bravest New Yorkers sample water from the Hudson River. (Don’t worry, the murky brown liquid has been filtered to be crystal clear and safe to drink.) Hart’s piece is part of an exhibit called Surface Tension that focuses on water: its movement, its growing scarcity, its contaminants, and its power to heal. More.
(Photo: “Urban Water Needs” by Hal Watts and Matthew Laws: water makes the sponges in this world map grow in proportion to the country’s water use. Courtesy of Science Gallery, Trinity College Dublin)

    Drink local. That’s the message of artist Colin Hart, whose public art piece lets the bravest New Yorkers sample water from the Hudson River. (Don’t worry, the murky brown liquid has been filtered to be crystal clear and safe to drink.) Hart’s piece is part of an exhibit called Surface Tension that focuses on water: its movement, its growing scarcity, its contaminants, and its power to heal. More.

    (Photo: “Urban Water Needs” by Hal Watts and Matthew Laws: water makes the sponges in this world map grow in proportion to the country’s water use. Courtesy of Science Gallery, Trinity College Dublin)

About me

The PRI Arts Tumblr is a collection of beguiling items created by our producers or found by our curators. PRI produces and distributes news, current events, arts and music content for radio, web and on-demand.

Likes